How to make friends when you’re pregnant

How to make friends when you’re pregnant

If you’ve just found out that you are expecting a baby, as well as dealing with lots of exciting changes, morning sickness and midwife appointments you might be wondering how to make new friends when you are pregnant.

If you’re the first of your friends to be pregnant, you’ll probably be keen to connect with other pregnant women and parents-to-be so you’ll have someone to chat to and support you through what’s a completely new experience.

Or you might be looking to speak to like-minded people who are due at the same time as you so you can compare early pregnancy symptoms, cravings and all those pregnancy niggles. Either way, here are five ways to make friends when you are pregnant.

If you’ve just taken a positive test, make sure you read our post on what to do when you find out you are pregnant.

Five ways to make new friends when you are pregnant

How to make friends when you're pregnant - NCT antenatal courses

1. Take an antenatal course with the NCT or NHS

Taking an antenatal class is a good way to learn about pregnancy and parenting, and also a great way to make new friends. The ante-natal courses run by the NCT (National Childbirth Trust) are a well-established way of making new friends when you are pregnant. The paid courses take place over a series of weeks or with condensed sessions in one weekend, and you’ll learn about labour and early parenthood in a small group of other couples and pregnant women. After the classes, it’s common for everyone to swap contact details so you can hopefully keep in touch when your babies arrive.

As well as courses with the NCT, look for other independent antenatal classes in your area. Your midwife should also be able to let you know about NHS antenatal courses at your local clinic or hospital, which are another way of meeting other mums-to-be and potentially making friends when you are pregnant. These classes are usually free to attend.

2. Take a pregnancy exercise or wellbeing class

How to make friends when you're pregnant

A good way of meeting other pregnant mums-to-be and potentially making new friends when you are pregnant is to take a pregnancy exercise or wellbeing class. These can range from pregnancy yoga through to hypnobirthing. Look at your local listing guides, on local Facebook groups or church hall noticeboards.

3. Ask around!

Even if no-one in your immediate friendship group is pregnant, if you have friends and colleagues at a similar age and stage to you, it’s likely that they will know someone who’s pregnant. And if it’s a friend of a friend, you’ll probably already have a lot in common. See if they can swap numbers for you so you can chat on What’s App or Facebook.

4. Chat to other mums online

How to make friends when you're pregnant - pregnancy friendship apps

Parent-focused forums are another good way to make friends when you’re pregnant, and these virtual friendships are a great way of giving and getting instant support, which often translate to real-life friendships. Sites like Mumsnet and have closed groups for pregnancy based on your due date – join in and get chatting.

5. Find friends on an app like Peanut

The app Peanut is often referred to as ‘Tinder for mums’ as it connects you with other women, in your local area, based on shared interests. Through the app you can find other mums-to-be, chat and meet up if you want. Download it and give it a go.

And how to make friends once the baby is here…

Going to a baby group or class is a good way of getting you and the baby out of the house once they’re arrived. Try an NCT playgroup, local baby group or try a baby-focused activity like Monkey Music or Gymboree. Your local library is also likely to have baby-focused singing and story sessions.

 

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Gillian Crawshaw

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