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Wellkid Guide

  • Nutrient Guide

    You may be wondering about the role of the specific nutrients in the Wellkid products. The information below explains why your body needs each nutrient and what its dietary sources are.

    Biotin

    Why does my body need it? Biotin plays a role in supporting normal psychological function and a healthy nervous system. it also contributes to normal hair and skin.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Almonds
    • Wholegrains
    • Egg
    • Cauliflower
    •  
    • Cauliflower

    Chromium

    Why does my body need it? Chromium helps to maintain your body's blood glucose levels and contributes to normal nutrient metabolism.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Potatoes
    • Garlic
    • Broccoli
    • Grapes
    •  
    •  
    • Garlic

    Copper

    Why does my body need it? Copper is a co-factor in the absorption of iron. It also contributes to normal hair and skin pigmentation.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Almonds
    • Lentils
    • Asparagus
    • Mushrooms
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Lentils

    Folic Acid

    Why does my body need it? Folate contributes to blood formation and has a role in cell division. It also reduces tiredness and fatigue

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Spinach
    • Bread
    • Fortified cereals
    • Chickpeas
    • Citrus fruits
    •  
    •  
    • Spinach

    Iodine

    Why does my body need it? Lodine contributes to the normal growth of children. It is also important in normal thyroid function.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Shellfish
    • Sea salt
    • Sesame seeds
    • Soybeans
    • Free-range eggs
    • Cod
    •  
    •  
    • Shellfish

    Iron

    Why does my body need it? Iron contributes to the cognitive development in children. It is also vital in the formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin and therefore assists with oxygen transport in the body.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Red meat
    • Liver
    • Beans
    • Dried fruit (e.g. apricots & raisins)
    •  
    •  
    • Red Meat

    Magnesium

    Why does my body need it? magnesium helps to support healthy energy metabolism, a healthy nervous system and normal muscle function, bone and tooth formation.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Sea food
    • Green leafy vegetables
    • Dairy products
    • Brown rice
    •  
    • Green leafy Vegetable

    Manganese

    Why does my body need it? Manganese contributes to normal bones and connective tissue. It also helps with energy metabolism.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Pecans
    • Brown rice
    • Avocados
    • Pineapple
    • Pulses
    •  
    • Pineapple

    Niacin (Vitamin B3)

    Why does my body need it? Niacin is used by your body to help release energy from food. It also helps to maintain a healthy nervous and psychological function.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Turkey
    • Wheat flour
    • Eggs
    • Milk
    • Peanuts
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Peanuts

    Omega-3

    Why does my body need it? Omega-3 fatty acids are required to help maintain healthy brain function and vision. Vegetarian flax seed oil for example is a rich source of Omega-3 alpha-Linolenic acid and so is fatty fish. Your body converts this into DHA (docosahexanoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentanoic acid). DHA is important because it plays a structural role in the cells of your central nervous system. EPA is required for optimal brain function and cell signalling.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines
    • Seeds including flax seed (vegetarian source)
    • Walnuts
    • Eggs
    • Fish

    Pantothenic acid

    Why does my body need it? Pantothenic acid assists with normal mental performance and supports energy metabolism.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Beef
    • Chicken
    • Eggs
    • Tomatoes
    • Broccoli
    •  
    •  
    • Tomatoes

    Riboflavin (Vitamin B2)

    Why does my body need it? One of its important functions is that it contributes to the maintenance of normal red blood cells. It also supports energy metabolism and protects cells from oxidative stress.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Bananas
    • Eggs
    • Yoghurt
    • Milk
    • Almonds
    •  
    • Banana

    Selenium

    Why does my body need it? selenium protects cells from oxidative stress. It is also important in helping to maintain a healthy immune function.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Brazil nuts
    • Tuna
    • Turkey
    • Spinach
    •  
    •  
    • Brazil Nuts

    Thiamin (Vitamin B1)

    Why does my body need it? Your body requires thiamin so that it can help convert carbohydrates from the food you eat into energy. It also contributes to the normal function of the heart.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Fortified breakfast cereals
    • Whole grains
    • Rice
    • Meat
    •  
    • Rice

    Vitamin A

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin A supports normal vision, normal skin and the immune system function.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Carrots
    • Eggs
    • Green leafy vegetables
    • Apricots
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Carrots

    Vitamin B6

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin B6 contributes to normal red blood cell formation and to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue. It also supports a normal nervous system and psychological function.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Fish
    • Poultry
    • Potatoes
    • Wholegrains
    • Milk
    • Potatoes

    Vitamin B12

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin B12 helps your body to release energy from food and supports a healthy nervous system.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Salmon, Cod
    • Eggs
    • Meat
    • Cheese
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Cod Fish

    Vitamin C

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin C is an important nutrient, which can help protect the cell from oxidative stress. It is required for the production of collagen, a protein found in your bones and skin. Vitamin C is also needed by your body to absorb iron from food.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Citrus fruits (e.g. oranges and kiwi fruits)
    • Potatoes
    • Broccoli
    • Dark green leafy vegetables
    •  
    •  
    • Kiwi

    Vitamin D

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin D helps your body to absorb an important mineral called calcium and by doing this it helps you to have strong bones and teeth. It also supports normal immune system function. Vitamin D is known as the 'sunshine vitamin' as your body can make this when exposed to a certain amount of sunlight.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Eggs
    • Fortified Margarine
    • Oily Fish
    • Milk
    •  
    • Milk

    Vitamin E

    Why does my body need it? Vitamin E helps to protect your cells against oxidative stress.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Nuts (e.g. almonds) and seeds (e.g. sunflower seeds)
    • Green leafy vegetables
    • Whole grains
    • Avocado
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    •  
    • Avocado

    Zinc

    Why does my body need it? Zinc is required to maintain proper functioning of your immune system and cell growth. It supports normal skin, hair, nails and bones.

    Where can I get this in my diet?

    • Beef
    • Cheese
    • Mushrooms
    • Seeds
    • Cocoa and Chocolate
    •  
    • Mushrooms
  • A Parent's Guide to Packing a Healthy Lunchbox

    Trying to make your child's lunchbox exciting and healthy can be a difficult task. It is important to provide a healthy lunch but also one that your child will eat! The guide below, will give you some simple ideas on how you can achieve this through a variety of different foods so your child doesn't become bored. Try and include your child in preparing their lunch boxes.

    Lunch Box

    Try to include each of the main groups

    • Breads and cereals
    • Fruit and vegetables
    • Protein
    • Milk and dairy products
    • Fats and sugar, in small amount

    Try and limit the intake of this group

    If you make your own cakes, try cutting down the amount of sugar and replace it with honey or dried fruits.

    Replace full fat dressings and spreads such as mayonnaise and cream cheese with the reduced fat variety.

    When adding meats as fillings, try and use fresh lean meat and not processed meats. It might be a little less convenient, but you'll be cutting out a lot of fat and salt.


    Lunchbox Suggestions

    You could include one item from each of the following sections

    The main meal

    Wholemeal bread, pitta bread pockets, tortilla wraps or bagels.
    Vary the fillings daily; cheese sandwiches everyday of the week can get a bit boring!

    • Tuna (in water) with sweetcorn, cucumber and reduced fat mayonnaise or low fat creme fraiche
    • Roast chicken salad
    • Cheese salad
    • Egg mayonnaise and tomato
    • Humus and cucumber

    Alternatively try and give different foods to break the routine. This can include:

    • Mixed vegetable and rice salad, including some beans or lentils
    • Kebabs with a yogurt dip
    • Pasta with salad and grilled chicken or tuna
    • Roasted vegetables and chicken in a tortilla wrap with salsa
    • Omelette or tortilla made with some vegetables and feta cheese

    The treat

    Include a semi-sweet or savoury treat for example:

    • Currant bun
    • Fruit and nut bars with no added sugars
    • Popcorn
    • Small portion of unsalted nuts and currants
    • Fruit rolls, made only with fruits
    • Low sugar oat biscuits (chocolate/ginger)
    • Some raisins

    Or add a dairy product as an extra source of calcium:

    • Small portion of cheese sticks
    • Small pot of low fat fruit yogurt
    • Small pot of fromage frais

    On your way to five a day...

    Don't forget to include a portion of fruit or vegetables to help achieve the recommended five a day!

    • 1 piece of fruit e.g. apple, banana, satsuma or peach
    • Small handful of grapes
    • Few slices of melon
    • 5 cherry tomatoes
    • Carrot and cucumber sticks
    • Small portion of dried fruit. A small box of raisins or 3 dried apricots counts as one portion of the 5 a day recommendation.

    Keep hydrated

    It is important for your child to keep hydrated throughout the day.
    Try not to give drinks with a high sugar content or fizzy drinks as these are bad for their teeth.

    • Small carton of fresh fruit juice (unsweetened)
    • Bottle of water
    • Bottle of flavoured still water
  • How to Deal with Fussy Eaters

    If you are worried about your child receiving adequate nutrients from their diet, you are not alone! Many parents find mealtimes difficult, especially when their children are fussy eaters. From determining what to feed your child to actually getting your child to eat what you have given them, can be quite an exhausting process!

    Family Lunch

    There are several small, easy actions that you can take to help mealtimes run more smoothly.


    • Try to eat regular healthy meals together as a family.

    • Don't make a fuss at mealtimes! This may cause your child to rebel even more and cause tension at the dinner table.

    • Encourage your child to help prepare the meals. Take them shopping and teach them to choose nutritious foods that they want to eat. Then decide on a recipe together and get your child involved in preparing it (under your strict supervision of course!). Having spent the time and made the effort to make the food, it may increase the likelihood of them wanting to eat it.

    • You are the primary role model to your child. Make sure that you set a good example to them with your own eating habits. If you eat processed ready meals that are high in fat and salt, chances are, that your children will too.

    • If your child feels hungry in between meals, give them nutritious snacks such as fruit, oatcakes, vegetable sticks with humus or a small pot of yogurt.

    • Listen to your child when they tell you that they don't like a particular type of food. It may just be that they don't like the way it has been cooked in that particular dish or the way it has been presented. Sometimes, all it takes is presenting the dish in a fun way, like making a face out of the vegetables on their plate or even spelling out their name.

    • Be creative when planning your meals. Having the same dish regularly can be boring. For example, if you are making pasta with sauce, add some chopped vegetables to the sauce when cooking to give it a different flavour and texture. It's also a good way of getting your child to eat more vegetables without it being too obvious.

    • Give your child small portions of food to begin with. If they are presented with a mountain of food on their plate at the beginning of the meal, this may put them off eating it.

    • Don't offer alternative foods as rewards, or say things like "no pudding until you've eaten all those vegetables". This may have a negative impact on your child eating vegetables in the future! By doing this you will also be reinforcing the idea that the pudding is more desirable than the vegetables.

    • Are you familiar with the notion that sometimes food tastes better when it's from someone else's plate? Well children sometimes think like that too! If you have something different on your plate, offer a small bite to your child to try.

    • Only offer one new food at a time and serve the new food with familiar ones. Make sure though that your child tries a new food a number of times as it can take a few attempts before they realise they like it.

    • Food fads are often short-lived. Offer the rejected foods every few weeks but don't force your child to have it. In time, your child may agree to give them a go!

    • Encourage your child to have a look at the nutrient guide so they can see why different types of foods are good for them.